Correlation Between Risk Perception and Outcome Expectancies on Dietary Compliance in Diabetes Mellitus Patients

Main Article Content

Arina Qona'ah
Nikmatul Fauziah
Gusmaniarti
Hikmah Lia Basuni
Corresponding Author:
Arina Qona'ah | arina-qonaah@fkp.unair.ac.id



Abstract

Introduction: Diabetic patients' non-compliance with diet can increase the risk of complications and decrease quality of life. Dietary compliance can be influenced by motivation, self-efficacy, knowledge, intentions, and family support. This study aims to analyze the relationship between perceived risk and expected outcomes with dietary compliance in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.


Methods: 150 respondents were obtained from five Primary Health Care in Surabaya through the cluster sampling method. The instruments used were a risk perception, a healthy diet-outcome expectation scale, and dietary compliance questionnaire. Data were analyzed using Spearman’s Rho statistics (α≤0.05).


Results: Most of the patients had moderate risk perception (67.3%) and high outcome expectation (48%). There was a significant relationship between perceived risk (p = 0.000) and expected outcome (p = 0.000) with dietary compliance in type 2 DM patients.


Conclusion: Diabetic patients' perceptions of their disease and the expected results have a positive effect on patient adherence to diet. Patients need accurate information about their disease so that they can create good perceptions and expectations.

Article Details

How to Cite
[1]
A. Qona’ah, N. Fauziah, Gusmaniarti, and H. L. Basuni, “Correlation Between Risk Perception and Outcome Expectancies on Dietary Compliance in Diabetes Mellitus Patients”, Babali Nurs. Res., vol. 3, no. 3, pp. 194-201, Nov. 2022.
Section
Original Research

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